Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Numerate Social Worker

Francis A. Taylor
Journal of Social Work Education
Vol. 26, No. 1 (Winter 1990), pp. 25-35
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23043207
Page Count: 11
  • Download ($58.00)
  • Cite this Item
The Numerate Social Worker
Preview not available

Abstract

In social work education, almost all efforts to teach quantitative analysis are relegated to statistics and research courses. This approach suggests that the only value of quantitative thinking is in formal research. Arguing to the contrary, this paper outlines some reasons why numeracy is essential to day-to-day social work practice. The mathematics preparation of social work students is reviewed and some attributes of the numerate practitioner are described. Some beginning steps are recommended to implement the proposed instructional strategy of integrating real-life quantitative modules in the curriculum. Numerate: marked by the capacity for quantitative thought and expression (Webster's, 1985)

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35