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LEARNING FROM THE MISTAKES OF OTHERS: A LOOK AT SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT IN RESEARCH

Margaret Gibelman and Sheldon R. Gelman
Journal of Social Work Education
Vol. 37, No. 2 (Spring/Summer 2001), pp. 241-254
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23043594
Page Count: 14
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LEARNING FROM THE MISTAKES OF OTHERS: A LOOK AT SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT IN RESEARCH
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Abstract

This article examines the issue of scientific misconduct and its implications for the training of social work researchers. An analysis is presented of an increasing body of cases in which allegations have been made and violations of legal and ethical research standards have been substantiated. Case examples illustrate that fields closely related to social work are developing their own set of case experiences of scientific misconduct. Implications for faculty and curriculum development are explored. The authors make recommendations toward the prevention and resolution of potential or actual instances of scientific misconduct in social work research.

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