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From "Public Archaeologist" to "Public Intellectual": Seeking Engagement Opportunities Outside Traditional Archaeological Arenas

Carol McDavid
Historical Archaeology
Vol. 45, No. 1, Archaeologies of Engagement, Representation, and Identity (2011), pp. 24-32
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23070201
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
From "Public Archaeologist" to "Public Intellectual": Seeking Engagement Opportunities Outside Traditional Archaeological Arenas
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Abstract

Cornel West has said that the role of the intellectual is to try to turn easy answers into critical questions and then put those questions to people with power. To whom do public archaeologists address these questions? I am currently involved in an ongoing experiment to use typically nonarchaeological venues to engage with multiple publics about "history matters." This includes participation in historical societies, commissions, and committees which may have stated aims to discuss, celebrate, and preserve history, but which frequently (sometimes unconsciously) perpetuate and reproduce traditional race/class inequities and power imbalances. My archaeological focus on inner-city African American neighborhoods in Houston, Texas, means that both my research and this larger project take place in settings where insensitive gentrification is impeding grassroots efforts to maintain and reclaim control of historical landscapes and narratives. This article will examine and critique this work, owning mistakes made and (usually small) victories achieved.

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