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Visuoauditory mappings between high luminance and high pitch are shared by chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and humans

Vera U. Ludwig, Ikuma Adachi and Tetsuro Matsuzawa
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 108, No. 51 (December 20, 2011), pp. 20661-20665
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23077302
Page Count: 5
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Abstract

Humans share implicit preferences for certain cross-sensory combinations; for example, they consistently associate higher-pitched sounds with lighter colors, smaller size, and spikier shapes. In the condition of synesthesia, people may experience such cross-modal correspondences to a perceptual degree (e.g., literally seeing sounds). So far, no study has addressed the question whether nonhuman animals share cross-modal correspondences as well. To establish the evolutionary origins of cross-modal mappings, we tested whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) also associate higher pitch with higher luminance. Thirty-three humans and six chimpanzees were required to classify black and white squares according to their color while hearing irrelevant background sounds that were either high-pitched or low-pitched. Both species performed better when the background sound was congruent (high-pitched for white, low-pitched for black) than when it was incongruent (low-pitched for white, high-pitched for black). An inherent tendency to pair high pitch with high luminance hence evolved before the human lineage split from that of chimpanzees. Rather than being a culturally learned or a linguistic phenomenon, this mapping constitutes a basic feature of the primate sensory system.

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