Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Canada's New Deal in the Needle Trades: Legislating Wages and Hours of Work in the 1930s

Mercedes Steedman
Relations Industrielles / Industrial Relations
Vol. 53, No. 3 (1998 SUMMER), pp. 535-563
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23077398
Page Count: 29
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Canada's New Deal in the Needle Trades: Legislating Wages and Hours of Work in the 1930s
Preview not available

Abstract

The essay examines the drafting of Canada's industrial standards legislation and its consequences in the clothing industry. In particular, it argues that the legislation formalized the subordination of specific sectors of workers in the clothing shops. The decision was a political one. How could gender be used as a basis of discrimination in a trade union movement in which women were in the majority? Although the traditional unions (ILGWU and ACWA) made some efforts to organize women, the presence of women in the union bureaucracy was limited. Because of this, the move away from shop-floor unionism towards industry-wide collective bargaining ensured that women had, at best, a peripheral position in union decision making. When the men in the industry sat down to negotiate the legal framework for their trade, most of the political manoeuvring went on in a domain exclusive of women. In the negotiations for the legislation in Ontario and Quebec's clothing industry, men reaffirmed the gendered nature of the work in the trade through legal language enshrined in the industrial standards schedules set for the industry. Este documento examina la redacción del la legislación que gobierna los standares industriales en Canadá y sus consecuencias en la industria del vestido. En particular, la argumentación es que la legislación formalizo el orden ya existente de sectores específicos de trabajo dentro de la industria. La decisión fue política. Como el sexo del trabajador pudo ser utilizado como base discriminatoria en el movimiento sindical en el que las mujeres eran la mojaría? Aun y cuando los sindicatos tradicionales (ILGWU y ACWA) hicieron esfuerzos por organizar a las mujeres, la presencia de ellas en la burocracia sindical fue muy limitada. Debido a esto el movimiento de un sindicalismo de base hacia un sindicalismo de industria garantizo el limitado papel de las mujeres en el proceso de decisión sindical. Cuando los hombres en la profesión se sentaron a negociar el marco legal de la legislación de la industria, la gran mayoría de las concesiones se otorgaron en sectores donde las mujeres predominaban. En las negociaciones en de las industrias en Ontario y Quebec, los hombres garantizaron la masculinización del trabajo introducción un carácter masculino a la presentación de la legislación a través del leguaje legal usado y los standares establecidos para la industria.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
535
    535
  • Thumbnail: Page 
536
    536
  • Thumbnail: Page 
537
    537
  • Thumbnail: Page 
538
    538
  • Thumbnail: Page 
539
    539
  • Thumbnail: Page 
540
    540
  • Thumbnail: Page 
541
    541
  • Thumbnail: Page 
542
    542
  • Thumbnail: Page 
543
    543
  • Thumbnail: Page 
544
    544
  • Thumbnail: Page 
545
    545
  • Thumbnail: Page 
546
    546
  • Thumbnail: Page 
547
    547
  • Thumbnail: Page 
548
    548
  • Thumbnail: Page 
549
    549
  • Thumbnail: Page 
550
    550
  • Thumbnail: Page 
551
    551
  • Thumbnail: Page 
552
    552
  • Thumbnail: Page 
553
    553
  • Thumbnail: Page 
554
    554
  • Thumbnail: Page 
555
    555
  • Thumbnail: Page 
556
    556
  • Thumbnail: Page 
557
    557
  • Thumbnail: Page 
558
    558
  • Thumbnail: Page 
559
    559
  • Thumbnail: Page 
560
    560
  • Thumbnail: Page 
561
    561
  • Thumbnail: Page 
562
    562
  • Thumbnail: Page 
563
    563