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Temperament Factors as Longitudinal Predictors of Young Adult Personality

James E. Deal, Charles F. Halverson Jr., Valerie Havill and Roy P. Martin
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly
Vol. 51, No. 3, SPECIAL ISSUE: Personality Development in Childhood and Adolescence (July 2005), pp. 315-334
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23096040
Page Count: 20
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Temperament Factors as Longitudinal Predictors of Young Adult Personality
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Abstract

While there is a general consensus that temperament forms the enduring, biologically based foundation of personality and that this biological basis should imply some continuity within the individual across time, there is a limited literature exploring linkages between these areas. The purpose of this article was to provide an initial assessment of the relation between a two-factor model of temperament in early/middle childhood and the five-factor model of personality in late adolescence/young adulthood. Data were gathered from 115 children who had participated in a longitudinal study of early/middle childhood and who provided follow-up data 15 years later. Significant linkages were found between the two time periods. At the facet level, temperament in early and middle childhood accounted for an average of 32% of the variance in personality in late adolescence/early young adulthood. At the domain level, temperament accounted for an average of 34% of the variance.

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