Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

School Engagement and Language Achievement: A Longitudinal Study of Gender Differences across Secondary School

Eva Van de gaer, Heidi Pustjens, Jan Van Damme and Agnes De Munter
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly
Vol. 55, No. 4 (October 2009), pp. 373-405
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23096232
Page Count: 33
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
School Engagement and Language Achievement: A Longitudinal Study of Gender Differences across Secondary School
Preview not available

Abstract

The present study investigated (1) gender differences in the longitudinal development of language achievement and school engagement (i.e., effort for language, attitude toward learning tasks, interest in learning tasks, and relationship with teachers) across secondary school (Grades 7–12, ages 12–18) and (2) gender differences in the association between these developmental processes. Data were drawn from the Longitudinal Project in Secondary School (LOSO project) that followed a cohort of 2,270 students in Flanders (Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) during secondary school. We used univariate and multivariate latent growth curve models to analyze the longitudinal data. The results showed, as expected, significant gender differences in the development of language. Girls showed a quasi-linear positive learning gain in language across secondary school, whereas boys started with a decline followed by acceleration in their learning gain in language. With regard to school engagement we observed a decline both for boys and girls, but the decline in the effort for language and the attitude toward learning tasks was steeper for boys than for girls. In addition, we found evidence for a positive longitudinal association between language achievement and school engagement, meaning that students who showed a smaller decline in school engagement also showed more learning gains in language. Moreover, only for boys were the school engagement starting levels related to their learning rates in language.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
373
    373
  • Thumbnail: Page 
374
    374
  • Thumbnail: Page 
375
    375
  • Thumbnail: Page 
376
    376
  • Thumbnail: Page 
377
    377
  • Thumbnail: Page 
378
    378
  • Thumbnail: Page 
379
    379
  • Thumbnail: Page 
380
    380
  • Thumbnail: Page 
381
    381
  • Thumbnail: Page 
382
    382
  • Thumbnail: Page 
383
    383
  • Thumbnail: Page 
384
    384
  • Thumbnail: Page 
385
    385
  • Thumbnail: Page 
386
    386
  • Thumbnail: Page 
387
    387
  • Thumbnail: Page 
388
    388
  • Thumbnail: Page 
389
    389
  • Thumbnail: Page 
390
    390
  • Thumbnail: Page 
391
    391
  • Thumbnail: Page 
392
    392
  • Thumbnail: Page 
393
    393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
394
    394
  • Thumbnail: Page 
395
    395
  • Thumbnail: Page 
396
    396
  • Thumbnail: Page 
397
    397
  • Thumbnail: Page 
398
    398
  • Thumbnail: Page 
399
    399
  • Thumbnail: Page 
400
    400
  • Thumbnail: Page 
401
    401
  • Thumbnail: Page 
402
    402
  • Thumbnail: Page 
403
    403
  • Thumbnail: Page 
404
    404
  • Thumbnail: Page 
405
    405