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ALTRUISM AND SOCIAL EXCHANGE THEORY: THE VICARIOUS REWARDS OF THE ALTRUIST

James M. Honeycutt
Mid-American Review of Sociology
Vol. 6, No. 1 (SPRING 1981), pp. 93-99
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23252591
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
ALTRUISM AND SOCIAL EXCHANGE THEORY: THE VICARIOUS REWARDS OF THE ALTRUIST
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Abstract

The position is taken that the altruistic person who is giving a reward to another is in a one-up or dominating position. The person receiving the reward is in a submissive role by virtue of acceptance of the reward. They may even feel that the reward is a cost if they are unable to reciprocate. Equity may enter into the context as the target of the altruism seeks to reestablish balance. While altruistic behavior may not result in immediate reward on the part of the "rewarder," there may be delayed or vicarious reward.

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