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CORRELATES OF BLACK PARAMILITARY ACTIVITY: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY

LAWRENCE K. PETTIT and PAUL C. SHAW
The Kansas Journal of Sociology
Vol. 6, No. 3 (Fall 1970), pp. 169-176
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23255066
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
CORRELATES OF BLACK PARAMILITARY ACTIVITY: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY
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Abstract

One indication of the racial polarization of our society is the rise of black paramilitary organizations. Interviews were conducted with a sample of active members of a black paramilitary organization located in a large Southern city. The young male respondents tended to be alienated, to have records of arrest and imprisonment, and to have served in the armed forces. Yet, they were found to adhere to a Protestant Ethnic and to be fairly representative in terms of economic status. It is suggested that race alone provides the motivation for black paramilitary activities.

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