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AUTHORITARIANISM IN THE CONVERSATION OF GESTURES

Robert E. Elliott Jr., Terry R. Herb and Robert F. Elliott Jr.
The Kansas Journal of Sociology
Vol. 7, No. 3 (Fall 1971), pp. 93-101
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23255236
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
AUTHORITARIANISM IN THE CONVERSATION OF GESTURES
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Abstract

Current studies of attitudes have relied upon written responses and the most obvious form of communication, the verbal. This study explores the nature of authoritarianism as expressed through body and head positions in interaction. Measures of role embracement were developed and evaluated. High authoritarians were found to be more rigid across situations than low authoritarians and to embrace the leadership role more often when subordinated than did low authoritarians.

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