Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

An Emerging "Strategic Partnership" Between Beijing and Seoul?: Myths and Realities

Taeho Kim
The Journal of East Asian Affairs
Vol. 22, No. 2 (Fall/Winter 2008), pp. 97-121
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23257898
Page Count: 25
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
An Emerging "Strategic Partnership" Between Beijing and Seoul?: Myths and Realities
Preview not available

Abstract

In light of the extensive ties between Beijing and Seoul—now termed as a "strategic cooperative partnership"—as well as of the growing importance of China on peninsular and regional affairs, how would the China factor play out in South Korea's future security environment and in the evolving U.S.-South Korean relationship? This essay attempts to shed some light on these complex yet consequential aspects of their bilateral ties. It argues that a) China's stakes on peninsular stability are largely based on security and economic interests; b) notwithstanding their extensive and growing ties, there are a host of potentially conflictual issues that have been under-researched and under-reported; c) South Korea needs to prioritize its ties with the U.S. and with China, even if it decides to maintain a close relationship with China; and d) China will become a source for both despair and hope in realizing South Korea's national objectives. In the mid to longer term, it is entirely possible that South Korea's political divergence with China on specific and concrete issues would affect the erstwhile discrete interactions with China in other dimensions. One cost-effective way of coping with this future uncertainty is to maintain exchanges and cooperation with China in select areas, while anticipating and preparing for any reversal of its present course toward the Korean Peninsula.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121