Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

"THE JUST WILL PAY FOR THE SINNERS": English Merchants, the Trade with Spain, and Elizabethan Foreign Policy, 1563—1585

Jason Eldred
Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies
Vol. 10, No. 1, THE SPANISH CONNECTION: Literary and Historical Perspectives on Anglo-Iberian Relations (SPRING/SUMMER 2010), pp. 5-28
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23267350
Page Count: 24
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

This article examines Anglo-Spanish prewar relations through a consideration of the commercial rapport that bound them. By focusing on the English merchants trading to Spain it is possible to recapture a culture of cooperation that existed between the two polities before it was smashed by the Armada War. Despite increasing tensions exacerbated by confessional suspicions, a number of English merchants and their supporters argued that closer relations with Spain would buttress English economic and political stability. These peaceful commercial relations were threatened by growing English maritime violence, demonstrated most spectacularly by Sir Francis Drake's 1577-80 circumnavigation of the world. A reassessment of the alternative foreign policy espoused by the merchants and those sympathetic to them reminds us that anti-Spanish sentiment in early modern England can be exaggerated, and that disagreements existed over the form of England's maritime future.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[5]
    [5]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28