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ATTITUDES TOWARDS EXISTING FACILITIES AND DEFICIENCIES IN THE HEALTH SPHERE FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THE SERVICES' CONSUMERS / עמדות כלפי הקיים והחסר בתחום הבריאות מבחינתם של צרכני השירותים

יורם ברזילי and רוני בר-צורי
Social Security (Hebrew edition) / ביטחון סוציאלי
חוברת‎ 8 (ניסן תשל"ה, מארס 1975), pp. 93-98
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23270331
Page Count: 6
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ATTITUDES TOWARDS EXISTING FACILITIES AND DEFICIENCIES IN THE HEALTH SPHERE FROM THE STANDPOINT OF THE SERVICES' CONSUMERS / עמדות כלפי הקיים והחסר בתחום הבריאות מבחינתם של צרכני השירותים
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Abstract

This paper is based on a survey conducted by the Histadrut's Institute of Economic and Social Research on attitudes towards welfare services among the urban population. The survey covered 1,529 Jewish household heads in ten towns and urban settlements (for purposes of processing, the settlements in the sample were grouped into four types). In the present survey, health services were examined from the following aspects: (a) A description of existing facilities in the sphere of health (as conceived by the interviewees). (b) Attitudes of the population towards what is to be found and what is lacking in the sphere of health services. The analysis was made in an attempt to identify consumers of health services by their main socio-demographic characteristics and by types of settlement. The principal findings and conclusions of the survey are as follows: A. The Scope of Medical Insurance Generally the urban population of Israel is insured in the Sickness Funds, mostly in that of the Histadrut. The non-insured population was identified as the more needy population group—the poor. In the large towns, the rate of non-insured belonging to the poorer groups is relatively high. B. Payment of Membership Fees Generally, the payment for the Fund's insurance is made by the insuree himself. The needy receive assistance from the Ministry of Social Welfare. There is a problem of those in need who are not in contact with the Ministry of Welfare and who do not receive medical treatment. C. Hospitalization The rate of hospitalized persons is high in development towns (the reasons for this over-hospitalization were not investigated). D. General Satisfaction A rather high level of satisfaction with health services was revealed regarding general clinics, dental clinics and municipal mother and child centers. The greatest satisfaction was with the mother and child center services, then with dental clinics and lastly with general clinics. E. Resort to Medical Services Outside the Funds The insurees generally contented themselves with the treatment given to them by the Fund in which they were insured. The use of services outside the Funds is an (indirect) index of dissatisfaction with existing facilities In development towns and new towns a greater tendency was discerned than in veteran settlements to resort to services outside the Funds. Most of those who restored to outside services were not members of the poorer strata. F. The Grading of Health Services among Services in General Health services in the residential quarter/district were generally graded in the lower levels of the scale of services and institutions that were lacking. Exceptions to this case were the development town which put the health services in a central place. These conclusions lead to two principal lines of action: A. Institutional Care of the Non-Insured Population The non-insured population constituted approximately 4% of the sample (in terms of the total urban population, its size is estimated at approximately 50-70,000 families). It should be noted that it is a population which is not insured either by itself or by the Ministry of Social Welfare and, as stated, it has all the characteristics of a poor stratum. It appears that the aspiration for the complete insurance of the population in a medical insurance system is a cardinal one. The non-insured should be located by the factors concerned and included in an institutional health framework. B. Higher Demand for Health Services in Development Towns As stated, there is excess demand for health services in development towns as expressed by over-hospitalization and the relatively high grading of health institutions among institutions that are lacking. The deficient information should be completed by studying the reasons for this demand: does it originate in the structure and nature of the present service, e.g. low-standard clinics which necessitate greater use of hospitals or is it a case of a population whose condition of health is relatively poor and therefore calls for treatment on a larger scale?

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