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Approaches to the Long-Term Care Insurance Law and their Cost Implications / הגישות הקשורות לפיתוח חוק ביטוח סיעוד והשלכותיהן הכספיות

ג'ק חביב, חיים פקטור, Jack Habib and Haim Factor
Social Security (Hebrew edition) / ביטחון סוציאלי
חוברת‎ 30, Towards the Implementation of the Long-Term-Care Insurance Law in Israel / לקראת הפעלתו של חוק ביטוח סיעוד בישראל‎ (סיוון תשמ"ז, יוני 1987), pp. 54-64
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23271365
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Approaches to the Long-Term Care Insurance Law and their Cost Implications / הגישות הקשורות לפיתוח חוק ביטוח סיעוד והשלכותיהן הכספיות
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Abstract

The Long-Term Care Insurance Law is one of the most complex pieces of social legislation ever passed in Israel. It was created in order to meet the urgent needs of the disabled elderly and their families. On the surface, the objective appears simple — to finance the personal and homemaking services needed by the elderly to function on a dayto-day basis. In reality, the problem is extremely complex. The difficulties which arose during the planning process are likely to plague the Law's implementation. They arise from the different existing and, at times, conflicting approaches regarding the provision of services to the elderly, and from the financial implications of these approaches for the national budget. This article will review the principal approaches which influenced the Law's formulation and their financial implications. We will look at the compromise which was worked out between the various approaches as represented by the Law which was passed, and at those factors which will affect the cost of the Law's implementation. We show that it is not possible to determine unequivocally the expected difference in cost of the different approaches. This depends on a number of factors in the formulation of the various approaches and on assumptions made in these approaches regarding the population's response. Nor is it possible to determine in advance the cost of the Law which was passed. This, again, depends on the population's response and also on the way in which the law is implemented. In particular, we have emphasized that the calculations of the Law's cost which have been done up until now assumed that every disabled person will utilize his eligibility to the maximum extent. We contend that this is not necessarily the case with respect to a system which first and foremost guarantees eligibility for services. In a system of this kind the extent to which the family is willing to provide care is a critical factor: It is likely that not all the families will exploit their eligibility to the maximum extent. We also emphasize that the law provides only a partial solution to the needs of the disabled elderly. If, indeed, the actual cost is less than the projected cost, it will be possible to use the surplus to expand the range of services and the eligible population within the law's framework.

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