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Response of Formal Support Systems to the Social Changes and Patterns of Caring for the Elderly / היענות מערכות הסיוע הפורמלי לשינויים החברתיים ולדפוסי הטיפול הממושך בקשישים

ברנדה מורגנשטיין and Brenda Morginstin
Social Security (Hebrew edition) / ביטחון סוציאלי
חוברת‎ 30, Towards the Implementation of the Long-Term-Care Insurance Law in Israel / לקראת הפעלתו של חוק ביטוח סיעוד בישראל‎ (סיוון תשמ"ז, יוני 1987), pp. 78-97
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23271367
Page Count: 20
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Response of Formal Support Systems to the Social Changes and Patterns of Caring for the Elderly / היענות מערכות הסיוע הפורמלי לשינויים החברתיים ולדפוסי הטיפול הממושך בקשישים
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Abstract

While it has been repeatedly recognized that family care and responsibility are the mainstay of community-based long-term care, formal support strategy has generally been based on a general policy of providing services when family care is absent or inadequate. A tacit presumption of such is that, in spite of the increasing burden of care, the family is considered a free resource. Against the background of rapidly increasing needs of disabled elderly it is necessary to formulate policy in planning formal support based on an understanding and anticipation of changing social conditions prevalent in each society. These changes must be viewed against recent trends towards reduced institutionalization, emphasis on home and community care, concern with quality of care and quality of life, and increasing expectations on the part of the elderly and his family to make independent decisions on the use of resources for care giving. It is proposed that response of formal services should be based on long-term goals of encouraging and assisting the family to continue executing its role of primary caregiver. It is suggested that one moves in the direction of shared costs within a flexible universal program which would include services as well as cash benefit as one option. An appropriate administrative framework is required to implement this program, as well as to develop a network of support services.

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