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Considerations and Constraints in Examining the Effect of Immigration from the Former Soviet Union on the Demand for Social Workers in the Welfare System Towards the End of the Decade / שיקולים ומגבלות בבחינת השפעת העלייה מברית המועצות (לשעבר) על הביקוש לעובדים סוציאליים במערכת שירותי הרווחה

אלעזר לשם and Elazar Leshem
Social Security (Hebrew edition) / ביטחון סוציאלי
חוברת‎ 38 (סיוון תשנ"ב, יוני 1992), pp. 74-97
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23271382
Page Count: 24
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Considerations and Constraints in Examining the Effect of Immigration from the Former Soviet Union on the Demand for Social Workers in the Welfare System Towards the End of the Decade / שיקולים ומגבלות בבחינת השפעת העלייה מברית המועצות (לשעבר) על הביקוש לעובדים סוציאליים במערכת שירותי הרווחה
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Abstract

An examination of immigration trends, characteristics, welfare needs, absorption and service development policy supports the assumption that the rising demand for various welfare services would also lead to greater demand for social workers, especially in the municipality social service system. However, it is quite difficult to make an accurate assessment of the above demand as a result of: 1. uncertainty as to immigration trends; 2. insufficient information regarding the patterns of immigrant service utilization; 3. high probability of latent social welfare needs in the population not manifested in contacts with the services; 4. uncertainty as to the influence of constantly deteriorating housing and employment conditions on patterns of contact with the services; 5. a continuing reduction in the provision of special services for immigrants; 6. trends in government policy to limit manpower levels in public services as well as budget allocations for personal welfare services; 7. the growing pluralism in the immigrant service systems as manifested among other things in a growing proportion of professionaly untrained manpower in service provision and the introduction of professionals from related fields into group and community activities of an essentially preventive character. In light of these factors, one cannot consider the expansion of the infrastructure of the community professional systems in 1991 by "immigration positions" (187 social work positions for the whole country excluding jobs derived from operations budgets), a clear precedent for the demands that may develop during the present decade and beyond. Continued study of the above factors and improving the data base regarding the patterns of utilization of services by immigrants from the former Soviet Union may in future provide more reliable data for reexamination of the subject. The partial data already available lead one to believe that the rate of service utilization by immigrants in the early stages of the absorption process is quite similar to that of the veteran Israeli population. However, it is reasonable to assume a progressive increase in the frequency of referrals to social services and the ratio of service recipients per population wherein background characteristics and immigration and absorption processes will have a clear effect on the patterns of referral and on the professional relationship between social workers and the immigrant clients.

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