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The Israeli Income Support Program in a Comparative Perspective / מערכת הבטחת ההכנסה בישראל בפרספקטיבה בין-ארצית משווה

אברהם דורון, ג'וני גל, Abraham Doron and John Gal
Social Security (Hebrew edition) / ביטחון סוציאלי
חוברת‎ 58, INCOME SUPPORT IN ISRAEL AND IN THE WORLD / הבטחת הכנסה בישראל ובעולם‎ (חשוון תשס"א, נובמבר 2000), pp. 5-27
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23273980
Page Count: 23
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Israeli Income Support Program in a Comparative Perspective / מערכת הבטחת ההכנסה בישראל בפרספקטיבה בין-ארצית משווה
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Abstract

This article looks at the Israeli Income Support Program, the country's primary safety net system, in comparative perspective. Employing qualitative and quantitative data on social assistance programs in other welfare states, it examines issues such as the degree of coverage that the programs provide, the modes of operation, the level of responsibility, work incentives, take-up levels, the generosity of the programs, their impact on poverty levels and, finally, their cost. The findings of the study indicate that, despite differences between the programs in various countries that reflect specific historical, ideological and economic contexts, there is a marked degree of similarity between the programs in the diverse national settings. The fact that the Israeli program was introduced in 1982, much later than those in most other welfare states, enabled policy makers to adopt various characteristics of the programs that already existed in other countries. In addition, the late adoption of income support in Israel meant that the target population of the program, individuals not covered by existing social security programs, was and has remained relatively small.

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