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"Knowledge Lived" and "Knowledge Learned": The Case of Income Security Recipients / "ידע מן החיים" לעומת "ידע אקדמי": המקרה של מקבלי גמלת הבטחת הכנסה

מיכל קרומר-נבו and Michal Krumer-Nevo
Social Security (Hebrew edition) / ביטחון סוציאלי
חוברת‎ 58, INCOME SUPPORT IN ISRAEL AND IN THE WORLD / הבטחת הכנסה בישראל ובעולם‎ (חשוון תשס"א, נובמבר 2000), pp. 132-150
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23273986
Page Count: 19
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
"Knowledge Lived" and "Knowledge Learned": The Case of Income Security Recipients / "ידע מן החיים" לעומת "ידע אקדמי": המקרה של מקבלי גמלת הבטחת הכנסה
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Abstract

"Knowledge lived" is knowledge possessed by people who live in poverty. It differs from "knowledge learned", or academic knowledge, in terms of the perspective this knowledge represents, the ways in which it is conceived, its trustworthiness, and the social legitimacy it is accorded. This article examines three recent research projects from the United States, Europe and Israel, which present the knowledge of those who have lived in extreme poverty and exclusion on different aspects of their lives. Through these examples, the article seeks to show how "knowledge lived", of the sort possessed by people who are welfare-reliant, might contribute to the body of general knowledge concerning this subject. Knowledge of this sort challenges standard preconceptions about the ways in which people cope with hardship; it may also develop further understanding of ways in which help to those in need might be given. The article discusses the ways in which "knowledge lived" can be recognized as such and investigated, and how it might contribute to the formation of public policy.

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