Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Reintroduction of Federally Endangered Harperella (Harperella nodosum Rose) in Flood-Prone, Artificial, and Natural Habitats

Elizabeth Fortson Wells
Castanea
Vol. 77, No. 2 (June 2012), pp. 146-157
Published by: Allen Press on behalf of the Southern Appalachian Botanical Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23274384
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($36.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reintroduction of Federally Endangered Harperella (Harperella nodosum Rose) in Flood-Prone, Artificial, and Natural Habitats
Preview not available

Abstract

Harperella (Harperella nodosum) is the only federally listed endangered plant species in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park (C&O Canal NHP) in the National Park Service in Maryland and one of four federally listed endangered plant species in West Virginia. This paper contrasts unsuccessful and successful efforts to reintroduce harperella seedlings in the main stem of the flood-prone Potomac River and on opposite sides of the river in damp sites in western Maryland and in streams in northeastern West Virginia. The reintroduction efforts in Maryland unsuccessfully transplanted seedlings on cobble bars on the Maryland side of the Potomac River and in artificial sites in the prism of the C&O Canal where harperella had never been found; the reintroduction efforts in West Virginia successfully transplanted seedlings on cobble bars in two tributaries of the Potomac River in West Virginia where harperella populations once flourished but in the last decade or so had been decimated by floods and ice damage. This investigation has contributed to defining harperella's life-cycle characteristics and ecological requirements. The data and observations presented can be used as a guide for reintroducing harperella seedlings and, by extension, other semiaquatic plant species into appropriate sites.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157