Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Economic Value of Social Policy and the Active Role of Passive Benefits / הערך הכלכלי של מדיניות חברתית והתפקיד האקטיבי של קצבאות פסיביות

יוכן קלאסן and Jochen Clasen
Social Security (Hebrew edition) / ביטחון סוציאלי
חוברת‎ 68 (אייר תשס"ה, מאי 2005), pp. 9-24
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23275942
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Economic Value of Social Policy and the Active Role of Passive Benefits / הערך הכלכלי של מדיניות חברתית והתפקיד האקטיבי של קצבאות פסיביות
Preview not available

Abstract

מאמר זה מתמקד בקשר שבין מדיניות חברתית למדיניות כלכלית. בשיח הציבורי הנוכחי מקובל להצביע על הקשר הקונפליקטואלי בין מדיניות, המיועדת לעודד צמיחה כלכלית ופיתוח המשק, ובין מדיניות המיועדת לקדם מטרות חברתיות, כגון התמודדות עם עוני, צמצום פערים חברתיים והבטחת ביטחון סוציאלי. מדיניות חברתית מתוארת, לעתים קרובות, כנטל כלכלי. אולם, הטענה המרכזית של המאמר היא, שהמדיניות בשני התחומים הללו, הכלכלי והחברתי, לובשת בפועל אופי משלים ותלות הדדית יותר מאשר אופי קונפליקטואלי. לצורך זה חלקו הראשון של המאמר דן ביתרונות הכלכליים של מדיניות חברתית, ואילו חלקו השני בוחן את הקושי בבחינה אמפירית של הקשר בין מדיניות כלכלית לחברתית. בהמשך מוצגת תפיסה של מדיניות חברתית, אשר דוגלת בראייה רחבה יותר של התרומות של מדיניות חברתית לקידום המשק והצמיחה הכלכלית. לא זו בלבד שמדיניות חברתית עשויה לשמש אמצעי ל"השקעה חברתית", אלא שלעתים גם קצבאות "פסיביות" עשויות למלא תפקיד כלכלי חשוב. תפיסה זו מומחשת בעזרת השוואה בין בריטניה ודנמרק והתפתחותן הכלכלית של המדינות הללו בשני העשורים האחרונים. (The 18th Richard Titmuss Memorial Lecture, on which this article is based, was delivered by the author on May 2, 2004 at the Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, with the cooperation of the National Insurance Institute, Jerusalem, Israel.) The article focuses upon the link between economic and social policy. In current debate a conflictual relationship is implied between economic policy on the one hand, and publicly funded and organized social policy on the other. Social policy is almost exclusively portrayed as a cost factor. The article seeks to present a view which emphasizes a complementary and interdependency rather than an antagonistic relationship between economic and social policy. It does so, first, by underlying the "economic" advantages of social policy and then by discussing problems of empirically testing the relationship between economic and social policy. Finally, a perspective of social policy is presented which is broader than the currently prominent thesis of a productive value of social policy which emphasizes the need to expand certain types of welfare state programs, such as labor market policy, education and child care as a form of "social investment". By implication, such a view tends to ignore or downplay the economic role of social policy, such as unemployment and other types of cash transfers. The claim made here is that by adopting a broader view, the legitimacy of arguably passive social policy programs rests not only on social but also on economic considerations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24