If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Conservation and Heritage in the Face of Insular Urbanization: The Marshall Islands and Kiribati

STEPHEN A. ROYLE
Built Environment (1978-)
Vol. 25, No. 3, Conservation: Experience outside the Industrialized West (1999), pp. 211-221
Published by: Alexandrine Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23287814
Page Count: 11
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Conservation and Heritage in the Face of Insular Urbanization: The Marshall Islands and Kiribati
Preview not available

Abstract

The conservation issues discussed here relate to two of the atoll nations of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Republic of Kiribati. Development has led to a cash economy on their capital atolls, Majuro and Tarawa respectively, which are experiencing in-migration and urbanization as outer-islanders seek to participate in this modern economy. These two nations thus face similar trends, shared by other atoll or archipelago countries. They differ, however, in the impact these trends have had in terms of the conservation issues of societal traditions, vernacular architecture and built form.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221