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PLANT REGENERATION FROM EMBRYOGENIC CELL SUSPENSION CULTURES OF LOLIUM TEMULENTUM

Z. Y. WANG, M. SCOTT and A. HOPKINS
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Plant
Vol. 38, No. 5 (September, 2002), pp. 446-450
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23321156
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
PLANT REGENERATION FROM EMBRYOGENIC CELL SUSPENSION CULTURES OF LOLIUM TEMULENTUM
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Abstract

Lolium temulentum L. (Darnel ryegrass) is a self-fertile and diploid grass species with a relatively short life cycle. We propose to use L. temulentum as a model system for genetic manipulation studies in forage and turf grasses, since most of the important grasses are outcrossing, require vernalization to flower, and in some cases are polyploid. As the first step to develop an efficient regeneration and transformation system, we performed a large-scale genotype screening for tissue culture responses using 46 L. temulentum accessions. Embryogenic callus formation frequency ranged from <1% to 11% across all accessions tested. Embryogenic calluses of a few responsive accessions were used to establish cell suspension cultures. The regeneration frequency of green plantlets from the established cell suspension ranged from 15% to 39%. After transferring the regenerants to the greenhouse, fertile plants were readily obtained without any vernalization treatment. This efficient plant regeneration system is being used for genetic transformation studies. With the development of genomics approaches for the improvement of forage and turf grasses, L. temulentum could serve as a model system for testing gene functions.

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