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The Tale of "The Man Who Did not Swear" — From Jewish Oikotype to Israeli Oikotype / הסיפור על "האיש שלא נשבע מימיו": מאויקוטיפ יהודי לאויקוטיפ ישראלי

עלי יסיף and Eli Yassif
Jerusalem Studies in Jewish Folklore / מחקרי ירושלים בפולקלור יהודי
כרך ח‎ (תשמ"ה), pp. 7-32
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23356298
Page Count: 26
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The Tale of "The Man Who Did not Swear" — From Jewish Oikotype to Israeli Oikotype / הסיפור על "האיש שלא נשבע מימיו": מאויקוטיפ יהודי לאויקוטיפ ישראלי
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Abstract

The article addresses questions concerning the transmission of Jewish folk-tales from the Middle Ages to Modern Times and the relation of the international folk-tale to the creation of the "Jewish oikotype". The example studied in depth is AT 938: Placidas (Eustace). As this tale-type appears in many variants, both in international and Jewish folk-literature — particularly in mediaeval and modern folklore in Israel — it offered a good case-study. Previously published monographs describing the migration of this tale-type from India to Western Europe have overlooked the importance of the Jewish variants of the story. The present article maintains that the Jewish versions played a central part in the East-to-West migration, which, according to the Wesselski hypothesis, occurred primarily with the written medium. Study of the oral versions collected in Israel in recent years indicates the emergence of a different oikotype, which, although deriving from the "Jewish oikotype", is related, both structurally and functionally, to new Israeli reality. These new versions create the "Israeli oikotype".

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