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Creative Problem Solving: Overview and Educational Implications

Donald J. Treffinger
Educational Psychology Review
Vol. 7, No. 3, Toward an Educational Psychology of Creativity, Part II (September 1995), pp. 301-312
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23359352
Page Count: 12
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Creative Problem Solving: Overview and Educational Implications
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Abstract

Creative Problem Solving (CPS) is a framework which individuals or groups can use to: formulate problems, opportunities, or challenges; generate and analyze many, varied, and novel options; and plan for effective implementation of new solutions or courses of action. Today's CPS framework builds on more than four decades of theory, research, and application in a variety of contexts. CPS involves the integration of both creative and critical thinking skills. Using CPS effectively also requires drawing upon several metacognitive and task appraisal skills. Current research and applications focus on flexible, dynamic, descriptive uses of CPS, moving away from traditional linear, prescriptive step-or stage-sequential models. CPS offers a powerful set of tools for productive thinking; these can be learned and used successfully by children, adolescents, and adults.

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