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The Mirror Neuron System and Observational Learning: Implications for the Effectiveness of Dynamic Visualizations

Tamara van Gog, Fred Paas, Nadine Marcus, Paul Ayres and John Sweller
Educational Psychology Review
Vol. 21, No. 1, Advancing Cognitive Load Theory Through Interdisciplinary Research (March 2009), pp. 21-30
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23361551
Page Count: 10
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Abstract

Learning by observing and imitating others has long been recognized as constituting a powerful learning strategy for humans. Recent findings from neuroscience research, more specifically on the mirror neuron system, begin to provide insight into the neural bases of learning by observation and imitation. These findings are discussed here, along with their potential consequences for the design of instruction, focusing in particular on the effectiveness of dynamic vs. static visualizations.

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