Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

On the Concept of Ẓimẓum in Kabbalah and its Research / על תולדות מושג ה'צמצום' בקבלה ובמחקר

משה אידל and Moshe Idel
Jerusalem Studies in Jewish Thought / מחקרי ירושלים במחשבת ישראל
כרך י‎, PROCEEDINGS OF THE FOURTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE HISTORY OF JEWISH MYSTICISM: LURIANIC KABBALAH / דברי הכנס הבינלאומי הרביעי לחקר תולדות המיסטיקה היהודית לזכר גרשם שלום: קבלת האר"י‎ (תשנ"ב), pp. 59-112
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23364516
Page Count: 54
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
On the Concept of Ẓimẓum in Kabbalah and its Research / על תולדות מושג ה'צמצום' בקבלה ובמחקר
Preview not available

Abstract

The term ẓimẓum recurs several times in the literature of early Kabbalah. Nahmanides' Commentary on Sefer Yeẓirah contains a significant passage, analysis of which demonstrates its close conceptual similarity to the view found in the Lurianic texts, namely that the first act of creation was the withdrawal of the divine light and glory from the space in which the world would be created. Similar views can be detected in other 13th-century texts of the Sefer ha-'Iyyun literature. Of great importance for 16th-century Kabbalah are some later developments, where the process of withdrawal is related to the emergence of evil out of the highest level of the divine world. This view recurs in the writings of Shem Tov ben Shem Tov, a 15th-century Castilian kabbalist. The assumption by scholars that the doctrine of the divine withdrawal was Isaac Luria's innovation, and that it was developed as a reaction to the expulsion from Spain is examined in the second part of the study. The appendices deal with the epistemological understanding of ẓimẓum and an early kabbalistic text, probably by Azriel of Gerona.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[59]
    [59]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75
  • Thumbnail: Page 
76
    76
  • Thumbnail: Page 
77
    77
  • Thumbnail: Page 
78
    78
  • Thumbnail: Page 
79
    79
  • Thumbnail: Page 
80
    80
  • Thumbnail: Page 
81
    81
  • Thumbnail: Page 
82
    82
  • Thumbnail: Page 
83
    83
  • Thumbnail: Page 
84
    84
  • Thumbnail: Page 
85
    85
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112