Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Death Penalty Sentiment in the United States

Hans Zeisel and Alec M. Gallup
Journal of Quantitative Criminology
Vol. 5, No. 3 (September 1989), pp. 285-296
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23365525
Page Count: 12
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Death Penalty Sentiment in the United States
Preview not available

Abstract

Pro-death penalty sentiment, at its all-time low in 1966 at 42% of the country's adult population, steadily rose to 71% in 1986. This average percentage varies widely for various subgroups of the population—as widely as between 43 and 93% at the extremes: political leanings, ethnic background, sex, and economic status are the main determinants. Death penalty sentiments are not of uniform strength: about one-third of the pro-death penalty population might give up their position if the alternative were life without parole and if they were convinced that the death penalty is not a deterrent. In the main, death penalty sentiment is not determined by utilitarian considerations but by moralistic ones, which in turn are part of the liberal—conservative dividing lines.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
285
    285
  • Thumbnail: Page 
286
    286
  • Thumbnail: Page 
287
    287
  • Thumbnail: Page 
288
    288
  • Thumbnail: Page 
289
    289
  • Thumbnail: Page 
290
    290
  • Thumbnail: Page 
291
    291
  • Thumbnail: Page 
292
    292
  • Thumbnail: Page 
293
    293
  • Thumbnail: Page 
294
    294
  • Thumbnail: Page 
295
    295
  • Thumbnail: Page 
296
    296