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Chlorophyll biosynthesis from glutamate or 5-aminolevulinate in intact Euglena chloroplasts

B. Gomez-Silva, M.P. Timko and J.A. Schiff
Planta
Vol. 165, No. 1 (1985), pp. 12-22
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23377674
Page Count: 11
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Chlorophyll biosynthesis from glutamate or 5-aminolevulinate in intact Euglena chloroplasts
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Abstract

Chloroplasts observed, by electron microscopy, to be intact and uncontaminated, with high rates of light-dependent protein synthesis and CO2 fixation were isolated from cells grown on low-vitamin-B12 medium in the light or from cells grown in the same medium in the dark and then exposed to light for 36 h. Both types of chloroplasts were active but less variability was encountered with developing chloroplasts from 36-h cells. The 36-h chloroplasts showed good light-dependent incorporation of 5-amino-levulinic acid (ALA) or L-glutamic acid into chlorophyll (Chl) a which was linear for approx. 1 h. The specific activity of the Chl a remained the same after conversion to pheophytin a, methylpheophorbide a or pyromethylpheophorbide a and rechromatography, indicating that the label was in the tetrapyrrole. Incorporation of ALA was inhibited by levulinic acid, and by chloramphenicol and other inhibitors of translation on 70S-type chloroplast ribosomes at concentrations which did not appreciably inhibit photosynthesis but which blocked plastid protein synthesis nearly completely. Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of translation on 87S cytoplasmic ribosomes of Euglena, was without effect. The 70S inhibitors did not block uptake of labeled ALA. Although labeled glycine was taken up by the plastids, no incorporation into Chl a was observed. Thus the developing chloroplasts appear to contain all of the enzymatic machinery necessary to convert glutamic acid to Chl via the C5 pathway of ALA formation but the Shemin pathway from succinyl coenzyme A and glycine to ALA appears to be absent. The requirement for plastid protein synthesis concomitant with Chl synthesis indicates a regulatory interaction and also indicates that at least one protein influencing Chl synthesis is synthesized on 70S-type plastid ribosomes and is subject to metabolic turnover.

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