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Isolation of a cDNA clone (PcSrp) encoding serine-rich-protein from Porteresia coarctata T. and its expression in yeast and finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.) affording salt tolerance

S. Mahalakshmi, G. S. B. Christopher, T. P. Reddy, K. V. Rao and V. D. Reddy
Planta
Vol. 224, No. 2 (July 2006), pp. 347-359
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23389461
Page Count: 13
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Isolation of a cDNA clone (PcSrp) encoding serine-rich-protein from Porteresia coarctata T. and its expression in yeast and finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.) affording salt tolerance
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Abstract

A 1.4 Kb cDNA clone encoding a serine-rich protein has been isolated from the cDNA library of salt stressed roots of Porteresia coarctata, and designated as P. coarctata serine-rich-protein (PcSrp) encoding gene. Northern analysis and in situ mRNA hybridization revealed the expression of PcSrp in the salt stressed roots and rhizome of P. coarctata. However, no such expression was seen in the salt stressed leaves and in the unstressed tissues of root, rhizome and leaf, indicating that PcSrp is under the control of a salt-inducible tissue-specific promoter. In yeast, the PcSrp conferred increased NaCl tolerance, implicating its role in salinity tolerance at cellular level. Further, PcSrp was cloned downstream to rice Actin-1 promoter and introduced into finger millet through particle-inflow-gun method. Transgenic plants expressing PcSrp were able to grow to maturity and set seed under 250 mM NaCl stress. The untransformed control plants by contrast failed to survive under similar salt stress. The stressed roots of transgenic plants invariably accumulated higher Na+ and K+ ion contents compared to roots of untransformed plants; whereas, shoots of transgenics accumulated lower levels of both the ions than that of untransformed plants under identical stress, clearly suggesting the involvement of PcSrp in ion homeostasis contributing to salt tolerance.

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