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The Teacher's Self-Image / הדימוי העצמי המקצועי של המורה בתהליך שיפור ההוראה

ליה קרמר and LYA KREMER
Studies in Education / עיונים בחינוך
H. 2 (טבת תשל"ד / ינואר 1974), pp. 143-148
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23390197
Page Count: 6
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The Teacher's Self-Image / הדימוי העצמי המקצועי של המורה בתהליך שיפור ההוראה
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Abstract

The question raised in this article is why changes in teachers' behaviour and in improvement of teaching are so slow, despite the enormous efforts which are put in both teachers' pre-service and in-service training. One of the possible answers suggested is: Since teacher's pre-service and in-service curricula usually emphasize ideal teaching behaviour and situations with little or no concern at all to the teacher's self-image, there is a danger of the creation of an unreal self-image. In fact most teachers don't really know themselves as teachers. There is quite a large gap between the image the teacher has of his teaching and the way he really acts. This gap is a serious barrier to the teacher's growth and improvement of teaching. The teacher who is not aware and sensitive to his teaching acts does not have any real basis from which to start the change. To overcome this problem it is suggested that in every in-service program of teacher training, opportunities be included for developing self-awareness. Different activities have proved to be efficient for this purpose and it would be worthwhile to provide students and teachers with such experiences as: self-confrontation — structured and unstructured as well — by the use of a video-tape recorder and interaction analysis in the cognitive and affective domains and also participation in T-group. All these should of course be supervised by professionals.

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