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CHANGING ATTITUDES IN THE ZIONIST MOVEMENT TOWARDS IMMIGRATION TO ERETZ ISRAEL (1904-1914) / טובת העם או טובת הארץ? יחסה של התנועה הציונית לעלייה בתקופת העלייה השנייה

מרגלית שילה and MARGALIT SHILO
Cathedra: For the History of Eretz Israel and Its Yishuv / קתדרה: לתולדות ארץ ישראל ויישובה
חוברת‎ 46 (טבת תשמ"ח / דצמבר 1987), pp. 109-122
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23400540
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
CHANGING ATTITUDES IN THE ZIONIST MOVEMENT TOWARDS IMMIGRATION TO ERETZ ISRAEL (1904-1914) / טובת העם או טובת הארץ? יחסה של התנועה הציונית לעלייה בתקופת העלייה השנייה
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Abstract

As the Zionist Movement began functioning on a day-to-day basis (following Herzl's death in 1904), it faced a crucial dilemma: which Jews should be encouraged to immigrate to Palestine? This basic policy question spurred the search for clear, accepted criteria regarding Jewish immigrants to Eretz Israel. The movement's resources were limited and the Zionist leadership was determined to avoid adventurous settlement schemes. For this reason, mainly young, healthy Jews ready for hard labor were encouraged to come. Arthur Ruppin, then head of the Palästina-Amt in Jaffa, explained that the gates would eventually be opened to others, but only when sufficient change occurred in economic and social conditions. A special case was that of the immigrants from Yemen, who were actively solicited to immigrate 'en masse'. But in fact, even this case was consistent with the new policy: these Oriental immigrants were seen by the early Zionist leadership as potentially ideal menial laborers—diligent, obedient and undemanding—who would save the Jewish agricultural settlements from harmful dependence on Arab labor (pages 109-122).

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