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AILA (EILAT) AND ITS GULF IN GREEK AND ROMAN SOURCES / אילת ומפרץ אילת במקורות היווניים והרומיים — מן האונומסטיקון של ארץ-ישראל

יורם צפריר and YORAM TSAFRIR
Cathedra: For the History of Eretz Israel and Its Yishuv / קתדרה: לתולדות ארץ ישראל ויישובה
חוברת‎ 53 (תשרי תש"ן / ספטמבר 1989), pp. 149-192
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23401688
Page Count: 44
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Abstract

The article lists and annotates all the known references to ancient Aila (Eilat) and its gulf in Greek and Roman sources. The survey stretches from mid-fourth century B.C.E. through the seventh century C.E. The appendix lists additional references which are later in date but dependent on earlier Byzantine sources. It is a part of a larger project named 'The Onomasticon of Eretz Israel', on behalf of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. The ancient geographers and historians were interested in the region because of the exotic nature of the Red Sea and of the people along its shores. But they were even more interested in the military and commercial importance of Aila and its gulf as a gateway to Arabia, Africa, and India. The references include maps and information about the inland routes from Aila to the port of Gaza, and to Jerusalem (for the benefit of the Christian pilgrims to Sinai). Administrative lists point to the place of Aila within the province of Palestina Tertia. Other items provide information about Aila as a military stronghold of the Roman Tenth Legion, and about the town's population in the Byzantine period.

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