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THE STRUGGLE FOR SUPREMACY IN THE PATRIARCHATE OF JERUSALEM IN THE SEVENTH CENTURY / מאבקה של האורתודוקסיה על השליטה בפטריארכיה הירושלמית במאה השביעית

מילכה לוי and MILKA LEVY
Cathedra: For the History of Eretz Israel and Its Yishuv / קתדרה: לתולדות ארץ ישראל ויישובה
חוברת‎ 64 (תמוז תשנ"ב / יולי 1992), pp. 31-58
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23403242
Page Count: 28
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THE STRUGGLE FOR SUPREMACY IN THE PATRIARCHATE OF JERUSALEM IN THE SEVENTH CENTURY / מאבקה של האורתודוקסיה על השליטה בפטריארכיה הירושלמית במאה השביעית
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Abstract

For over fifty years, between 638-c. 690, the office of Patriarch of Jerusalem was not filled. Although the timing might suggest that this interruption in the line of patriarchs was a result of the Arab conquest, it was actually due to internal strife between two groups: the Monothelites, who believed that Jesus had but 'one will', and the Diothelites, who believed that just as he had two natures, he had 'two wills'. The first party was supported by a large group of native Syriac speakers. This group tried to moderate the decisions of Chalcedon and adapt them as much as possible to the Monophysite dogma which was widely accepted in the East. The second group was represented by a school of monks from the Judean Desert (mainly from Mar-Saba, Theodosius, and Khareitun) formed and headed at first by the patriarch Sophronius (634-638) and Maximus Confessor. This was a cosmopolitan, mainly Greek-speaking group made up of zealous adherents of Chalcedonic orthodoxy. The long and difficult strife between these two groups prevented the appointment of a patriarch in Jerusalem until this question was finally settled at the Sixth Ecumenical Council in 680.

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