Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

IMMIGRATION AND ALIYAH: NEW ASPECTS OF JEWISH POLICY / הגירה ועלייה: היבטים חדשים של מדיניות יהודית

דליה עופר and DALIA OFER
Cathedra: For the History of Eretz Israel and Its Yishuv / קתדרה: לתולדות ארץ ישראל ויישובה
חוברת‎ 75 (ניסן תשנ"ה / אפריל 1995), pp. 142-173
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23403523
Page Count: 32
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
IMMIGRATION AND ALIYAH: NEW ASPECTS OF JEWISH POLICY / הגירה ועלייה: היבטים חדשים של מדיניות יהודית
Preview not available

Abstract

In the wake of the extensive Migration in modern times, Jewish organizations in the Diaspora were impelled to establish a policy of helping immigrants to find countries to accept them and of providing support during their initial absorption. The Zionist movement formulated an immigration policy based on ideological principles and practical needs. After World War II, a change occurred in the attitude of the Jewish organizations toward the massive migration of Jews, and the Zionist movement also modified its fundamental attitudes toward aliyah to Eretz Israel. The State of Israel adjusted its aliyah policies to ideological principles, demographic needs, and political interests. However, despite the cooperation between Israel and the Jewish organizations, the basic contradictions in their immigration/aliyah goals remained. The principle of individual freedom of choice apparently directed the Jewish organizations, while Israel held that aliyah to Eretz Israel should take precedence. The gap between the declarations and policies of the Jewish organizations became apparent during the period of mass immigration. Their ability to implement the principle of free choice was affected by the decisions of sovereign nations. Israel, on its part, did not limit aliyah, despite many difficulties, and sought the support of the Jewish organizations for aliyah and immigrant absorption. In effect, this necessary cooperation, and the dependence on the decisions of sovereign governments including that of Israel, established the parameters of action by Israel and the Jewish organizations.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
143
    143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[156]
    [156]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
  • Thumbnail: Page 
171
    171
  • Thumbnail: Page 
172
    172
  • Thumbnail: Page 
173
    173