Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Heine Cult in Hebrew Literature of the 1890s and Its Russian Context / ההתקבלות של היינה בספרות העברית בשנות התשעים בהקשרה הרוסי

חמוטל בר-יוסף and Hamutal Bar-Yosef
Dappim: Research in Literature / דפים למחקר בספרות
כרך‎ 8 (1991-92), pp. 319-332
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23417372
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Heine Cult in Hebrew Literature of the 1890s and Its Russian Context / ההתקבלות של היינה בספרות העברית בשנות התשעים בהקשרה הרוסי
Preview not available

Abstract

Why did the enthusiastic interest of Hebrew literature in Heine begin only at the end ot the nineteenth century, following fifty to sixty years of rather reserved reception? Why did the 'Heine epidemic' begin when the centre of Hebrew literature moved to Russia, and not when it was in Germany? In articles written in the 1890s Heine was depicted as a decadent poet who totally alienated himself from his Jewish roots but still remained 'a distant brother' (Bernfeld). The change is also reflected in the choice of poems which were translated (Mintz). Heine's 'decadent' traits (later emphasized by A. Blok) were revealed and appreciated by Hebrew writers of the 1890s, because at that time Hebrew literature was experiencing the same processes that created the Russian Age of Silver and the West European fin de siècle. These processes endangered its national ideology. Heine's cult was one of the ways whereby decadence could penetrate indirectly and mildly into Hebrew national literature.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[319]
    [319]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320
  • Thumbnail: Page 
321
    321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
322
    322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
323
    323
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
325
    325
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326
  • Thumbnail: Page 
327
    327
  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329
  • Thumbnail: Page 
330
    330
  • Thumbnail: Page 
331
    331
  • Thumbnail: Page 
332
    332