Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Holmes, Brandeis, and the Right to Freedom of Speech in the Constitution / הולמס,ברנדייס והזכות לחופש הביטוי בחוקה

פנינה להב and Penina Lahav
Zmanim: A Historical Quarterly / זמנים: רבעון להיסטוריה
חוברת‎ 26, החוקה האמריקנית‎ 1787-1987 (קיץ 1987), pp. 84-91
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23435075
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

היכן עובר הגבול בין הסובלנות וחופש הביטוי, לבין הכרה ברעיונות מסוכנים ואנטי-דמוקרטיים? שאלה זו, הניצבת כיום בפני בית-המשפט הישראלי, עמדה בכל חריפותה בפני שופטיה הפדרליים של ארצות-הברית בתחילת המאה. שניים משופטים אלה, הולמס וברנדייס, בחרו להתיר את חופש הביטוי, ולו גם במחיר האתגר לביטחון ולדמוקרטיה. הנמקותיהם לחוות-הדעת היו שונות. על פי הולמס יש להתיר לרעיונות להתעמת בינם לבין עצמם בחופש גמור כדי להגיע אל האמת. ברנדייס, לעומתו, בחר לטעון שהבעת דעה היא חובה ההופכת את האדם לאזרח טוב ומועיל יותר. הבחירה בין גישתו הנייטרלית של הולמס, לבין גישתו הערכית של ברנדייס, גישה המחייבת גם את השופט לחוות דעתו על הטוב והנכון, מהווה אתגר גם למערכת המשפט כאן ועכשיו. Where does the border run between tolerance and free speech, as opposed to the recognition of dangerous and anti-democratic ideas? This question, which faces the Israeli courts today, also faced the federal judges of the United States at the beginning of the century. Two of these judges — Holmes and Brandeis — chose to permit free speech even at the price of a challenge to democracy. Yet although Holmes argued that only a free contest between ideas, without any interference, would lead to the discovery of the truth, Brandeis thought that among the roles of the judge was to express norms and values, and thereby to influence society.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[84]
    [84]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[85]
    [85]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91