Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Patch size and edge proximity are useful predictors of brood parasitism but not nest survival of grassland birds

Thomas J. Benson, Scott J. Chiavacci and Michael P. Ward
Ecological Applications
Vol. 23, No. 4 (June 2013), pp. 879-887
Published by: Wiley
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23440933
Page Count: 9
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Patch size and edge proximity are useful predictors of brood parasitism but not nest survival of grassland birds
Preview not available

Abstract

Declines of migratory birds have led to increased focus on causative factors for these declines, including the potential adverse effects of habitat fragmentation on reproductive success. Although numerous studies have addressed how proximity to a habitat edge, patch size, or landscape context influence nest survival or brood parasitism, many have failed to find the purported effects. Furthermore, many have sought to generalize patterns across large geographic areas and habitats. Here, we examined evidence for effects of edge proximity, patch size, and landscape context on nest survival and brood parasitism of grassland birds, a group of conservation concern. The only consistent effect was a positive association between edge proximity and brood parasitism. We examined effects of patch size on nest survival (37 studies) and brood parasitism (30 studies) representing 170 and 97 different estimates, respectively, with a total sample size of >14 000 nests spanning eastern North America. Nest survival weakly increased with patch size in the Great Plains, but not in the Midwestern or Eastern United States, and brood parasitism was inversely related to patch size and consistently greater in the Great Plains. The consistency in brood parasitism relative to nest survival patterns is likely due to parasitism being caused by one species, while nest survival is driven by a diverse and variable suite of nest predators. Often, studies assume that predators responsible for nest predation, the main driver of nest success, either are the same or exhibit the same behaviors across large geographic areas. These results suggest that a better mechanistic understanding of nest predation is needed to provide meaningful conservation recommendations for improving grassland bird productivity, and that the use of general recommendations across large geographic areas should only be undertaken when sufficient data are available from all regions.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
879
    879
  • Thumbnail: Page 
880
    880
  • Thumbnail: Page 
881
    881
  • Thumbnail: Page 
882
    882
  • Thumbnail: Page 
883
    883
  • Thumbnail: Page 
884
    884
  • Thumbnail: Page 
885
    885
  • Thumbnail: Page 
886
    886
  • Thumbnail: Page 
887
    887