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Les hauts niveaux pléistocènes du Tuzgölü (lac Salé) en Anatolie centrale (Turquie)

Oguz Erol
Annales de Géographie
79e Année, No. 431, Les pays arides (Janvier-Février 1970), pp. 39-50
Published by: Armand Colin
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23447231
Page Count: 14
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Les hauts niveaux pléistocènes du Tuzgölü (lac Salé) en Anatolie centrale (Turquie)
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Abstract

The Tuzgölü (the Salt Lake) basin was covered with a relatively extensive freshwater lake, and erosional and depositional surfaces where surrounding it during the Miocene-Lower Pliocene. As a result of tectonic movements the central part of the basin was downfaulted and a smaller freshwater lake was formed during the Upper Pliocene. In the Quaternary the subsidence of the bottom of the basin was also continued, but this was very restricted in the central part of it. A slightly brakish-salty lake, which was larger than the recent one, was formed in this basin during the Pleistocene. The tectonically undisturbed coastline traces of this Pleistocene lake, are regularly seen at 1015, 980, 955-950, 940, 930, 920 and 915-912 meters all around the recent Salt Lake, the surface of which is 905 m high above the sea-level. These traces may indicate higher levels of the lake during the Pleistocene (relatively rainy and cooler) pluvial periods in a basin, the central part of which was slowly subsiding. Some ostracods found in deltaic sediments of the highest level (1015 m). They are species living in the waters of rivers and lakes colder than 12 °C, and they may indicate a fairly cooler climate. On the basis of general geomorphological characteristics, the fossils, and the soils covering the terraces, it is possible to accept that the coastline traces higher than 940 m, that is 1015, 980, 955 m levels must have been formed before the last (Würm) pluvial period, and the first two of them may belong to the Early Pleistocene (Günz? and Mindel?) and the 950 m level to the Riss (?) pluvials. Several coastline traces can be seen clearly in air-photos below the 940 m level down to 905 m. Six coastline traces at 940, 930, 920, 915, 912, 908 meters, among the others are more visible. The first two of them may belong to the last (Würm) pluvial, while the lower ones may have been formed during the recessional phases of the lake since the beginning of the Holocene. There are some indications that the lake might have been dried out during the interpluvial periods of the Pleistocene. If this is the case, one might expect some buried salt (and perhaps even potash) beds under the recent Salt Lake bottom.

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