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Journal Article

Statistical Inference in Crime Investigations Using Deoxyribonucleic Acid Profiling

D. A. Berry, I. W. Evett and R. Pinchin
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series C (Applied Statistics)
Vol. 41, No. 3 (1992), pp. 499-531
Published by: Wiley for the Royal Statistical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2348086
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2348086
Page Count: 33
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Statistical Inference in Crime Investigations Using Deoxyribonucleic Acid Profiling
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Abstract

Deoxyribonucleic acid profiling has attracted widespread publicity because of the impact that it is making on the investigation of crime. Whereas considerable effort has been expended on the refinement of the laboratory systems for carrying out the technique, the development of efficient numerical procedures for evaluating the evidence contained in the profiles has attracted little attention. We have developed a method, based on the Bayesian likelihood ratio, for evaluating fragment length data in a crime case where a profile from a suspect is to be compared with a profile from a sample taken from the scene of the crime. Our treatment takes account of correlation in fragment length measurement errors and avoids an independence assumption which is currently being made by practitioners. We describe experiments which demonstrate the superiority of the method over the conventional method which is based on simple hypothesis tests.

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