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Post-Stroke Depression – A Review and Description of a Follow-Up Study of Depression in Stroke Patients / דיכאון לאחר אירוע מוחי: סקירה, ותיאור מחקר מעקב בחולי אירוע מוחי

שרלוט הופ, שושנה טנא, ישראל אדלר, Charlotte Hopp, Shoshanah Tenne and Israel Adler
Gerontology / גרונטולוגיה
No. 68, Mal Function and Degeneration in the Aging Brain / הזקן - תפקוד לקוי וניוון במוח‎ (אביב, 1995), pp. 54-64
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23480940
Page Count: 11
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Post-Stroke Depression – A Review and Description of a Follow-Up Study of Depression in Stroke Patients / דיכאון לאחר אירוע מוחי: סקירה, ותיאור מחקר מעקב בחולי אירוע מוחי
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Abstract

Depression is regarded as a specific complication of stroke. The clinical characteristics of major and minor depression are similar to those of functional depression. The use of scales for identifying depressed mood is described. The prevalence of depression is between 30% and 50% of post stroke patients and remains unchanged for at least two years. Physical impairment, intellectual deterioration and decreased social activity interact with depression. Although antidepressive treatment is effective it is seldom used. The present study is based on the follow-up of hospitalized cases of stroke. 167 cases followed up to two years were assessed for depressed mood using the Wakefield Self-assessment Depression Inventory, and for physical social and cognitive impairments. The prevalence of poststroke depression was 38% in hospital and increased to 50% at two years. Longitudinal follow-up demonstrated the chronic nature of poststroke depression. The nature of the interaction between depressed mood and cognitive, social and physical impairments is described. Cognitive impairment acts as a direct influence on the inhibition of depression in hospital and is itself perpetuated by the depression. Impairment of social activity and depression are mutually interactive at all periods during follow-up demonstrating a cycle of less activity – more depression – less activity. Other physical and neurological impairments are directly related to impairment of social activity, thus acting indirectly on depression. Depression once established is self-perpetuating – this was demonstrated to be the most important effect examined.

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