Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Dealing With Conflicting Forecasts: The Eclectic Advantage

Robert T. Falconer and Charles M. Sivesind
Business Economics
Vol. 12, No. 4 (September 1977), pp. 5-11
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23481228
Page Count: 7
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Dealing With Conflicting Forecasts: The Eclectic Advantage
Preview not available

Abstract

Most business forecasters receive and read more than one forecasting service, but the many forecasts received are seldom combined in a systematic way to produce a composite forecast. And, it might appear such a technique might do nothing more than to compound errors. Not so, say the authors of this paper. They show that a forecast built from two other forecasts can be more accurate than either of the two underlying forecasts. Accuracy in forecasting, however, is not simply a matter of "the more forecasts in the pot, the better the prediction," and the authors tell what to look for in creating a combination of forecasts.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11