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An Application of Rasch Analysis to Questionnaire Design: Using Vignettes to Study the Meaning of `Work' in the Current Population Survey

Elizabeth A. Martin, Pamela C. Campanelli and Robert E. Fay
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series D (The Statistician)
Vol. 40, No. 3, Special Issue: Survey Design, Methodology and Analysis (2) (1991), pp. 265-276
Published by: Wiley for the Royal Statistical Society
DOI: 10.2307/2348279
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2348279
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
An Application of Rasch Analysis to Questionnaire Design: Using Vignettes
              to Study the Meaning of `Work' in the Current Population Survey
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Abstract

As part of the research to develop a new questionnaire for the Current Population Survey (CPS), a special respondent debriefing study was designed to learn more about how respondents understand and formulate their answers to the labor force questions. Between July and December of 1988, a sample of approximately 2300 respondents answered standardized debriefing questions after they had completed the main CPS interview. As part of the respondent debriefing interview, respondents were asked to classify descriptions of various activities in terms of their own understanding of labor force concepts, such as 'work'. The findings clearly show that many respondents interpret 'work' differently from that intended by the survey definition of work. Results further suggest that respondents' definitions depend on their characteristics and experience.

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