Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

INNOVATION AND PRESTIGE AMONG NORTHERN HUNTER-GATHERERS: LATE PREHISTORIC NATIVE COPPER USE IN ALASKA AND YUKON

H. Kory Cooper
American Antiquity
Vol. 77, No. 3 (July 2012), pp. 565-590
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23486289
Page Count: 26
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($9.95)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
INNOVATION AND PRESTIGE AMONG NORTHERN HUNTER-GATHERERS: LATE PREHISTORIC NATIVE COPPER USE IN ALASKA AND YUKON
Preview not available

Abstract

Several different ethnolinguistic groups in south-central Alaska and southwestern Yukon used native copper. This indigenous innovation diffused throughout the region with the majority of use occurring from A.D. 1000 to 1700. The relatively recent origin of this technology and its continued use long after European contact provide an opportunity to examine the process of innovation among hunter-gatherers using archaeology, metallurgy, and ethnohistory. The analysis of these data using a Behavioral Archaeology framework demonstrates that native copper was used for both practical and prestige technology among groups of varying social complexity. Northern Athabascans did not use native copper overtly as prestige technology, but its many supernatural associations suggest it was a "prestigious" material. Furthermore, native copper provided northern Athabascan aggrandizer-innovators the opportunity to acquire prestige and power through their monopolization of trade relationships and subsequent control of the movement of native copper. Plusieurs groupes ethnolinguistiques du centre-sud de l'Alaska et du sud-ouest du Yukon faisaient usage du cuivre natif. Cette innovation autochtone s'est diffusé à travers la région, avec un usage particulièrement intense entre 1000 et 1700 AD. L'origine relativement récente de cette technologie et son usage continu au-delà du contact Européen offre l'opportunité d'examiner le processus d'innovation chez les chasseurs-cueilleurs à travers l'archéologie, la métallurgie, et l'ethnohistoire. L'analyse de ces données dans une perspective d'archéologie comportementale (Behavioral Archaeology) indique que l'usage du cuivre natif s'insérait dans des technologies autant utilitaires que de prestige chez des groupes aux degrés de complexité variés. Bien que chez les Athabascans du nord le cuivre n'était pas ouvertement utilisé comme bien de prestige, ses associations surnaturelles suggèrent qu'il s'agissait néanmoins d'un matériau prestigieux. De plus, le cuivre natif pouvait procurer aux innovateurs-agrandisseurs Athabascans des opportunités d'obtention de pouvoir et prestige à travers le monopole de relations d'échanges et le contrôle subséquent des mouvements du cuivre natif.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
565
    565
  • Thumbnail: Page 
566
    566
  • Thumbnail: Page 
567
    567
  • Thumbnail: Page 
568
    568
  • Thumbnail: Page 
569
    569
  • Thumbnail: Page 
570
    570
  • Thumbnail: Page 
571
    571
  • Thumbnail: Page 
572
    572
  • Thumbnail: Page 
573
    573
  • Thumbnail: Page 
574
    574
  • Thumbnail: Page 
575
    575
  • Thumbnail: Page 
576
    576
  • Thumbnail: Page 
577
    577
  • Thumbnail: Page 
578
    578
  • Thumbnail: Page 
579
    579
  • Thumbnail: Page 
580
    580
  • Thumbnail: Page 
581
    581
  • Thumbnail: Page 
582
    582
  • Thumbnail: Page 
583
    583
  • Thumbnail: Page 
584
    584
  • Thumbnail: Page 
585
    585
  • Thumbnail: Page 
586
    586
  • Thumbnail: Page 
587
    587
  • Thumbnail: Page 
588
    588
  • Thumbnail: Page 
589
    589
  • Thumbnail: Page 
590
    590