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PLASMID PATTERNS, SEROTYPING AND KANAGAWA PHENOMENON OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS ISOLATES FROM MAN, WATER AND FISH IN CALCUTTA, INDIA

UTPALA MITRA, SP DE, GB NAIR, BL SARKER, B.L. Sarkar and SUNIL PALCHAUDHURI
Journal of Diarrhoeal Diseases Research
Vol. 5, No. 3 (September 1987), pp. 171-174
Published by: icddr,b
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23498022
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
PLASMID PATTERNS, SEROTYPING AND KANAGAWA PHENOMENON OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS ISOLATES FROM MAN, WATER AND FISH IN CALCUTTA, INDIA
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Abstract

Reproducible plasmid pattern was obtained for 16 isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from man, fresh water and fresh water fish, using an improved technique. Most of the isolates belonged to common serotypes O and K but differed in their plasmid profiles. Two of the nine isolates from man were Kanagawa negative, while the rest were all positives i.e. they produced the virulence factor of thermostable direct haemolysin. Isolates harboured plasmids of varying sizes, and there was no common plasmid. That the Kanagawa gene is likely to be chromosomal in these was shown by the presence of plasmid-free Kanagawa-positive derivatives. Except for ampicillin resistance, virulent isolates from patients differed from the environmental isolates in plasmid profiles, serotypes and Kanagawa reaction. It is therefore, concluded that isolates from human and environmental (fish and water) sources of Calcutta are not epidemiologically related.

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