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Promotion of Breast Feeding in the Community: Impact of Health Education Programme in Rural Communities in Nigeria

Anita A Davies-Adetugbo
Journal of Diarrhoeal Diseases Research
Vol. 14, No. 1 (March 1996), pp. 5-11
Published by: icddr,b
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23498552
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Promotion of Breast Feeding in the Community: Impact of Health Education Programme in Rural Communities in Nigeria
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Abstract

Breast feeding has been recognized as a child survival strategy, while breast feeding programmes have been increasingly implemented in many communities. This study assesses the effectiveness of a breast feeding education programme launched through the primary health care programme in the rural communities of Nigeria. Late trimester pregnant women were enrolled into the study and given a questionnaire on knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) about breast feeding. Women in the study group (n=126) received breast feeding counselling before and after delivery, while those in control group (n=130) did not receive any counselling. Both groups were monitored after delivery and followed with the KAP questionnaire. The results of the study showed marked improvements in the intervention group for colostrum feeding (p=0.0000). Moreover, 31.6% of the mothers in the intervention group practised timely initiation of breast feeding compared to 5.6% of the controls, and the prevalence of exclusive breast feeding at 4 months was 39.8% in the intervention group compared to 13.9% for the controls. Multivariate analysis showed that the intervention was a powerful and the only significant predictor of the increase in breast feeding behaviours (p=0.0000), and that an early initiation of breast feeding is a strong predictor of exclusive breast feeding at 4 months of age. It is concluded that breast feeding promotion in rural communities is feasible and can lead to behavioural changes.

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