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An Outbreak of Group C Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Among Children Attending a Day-care Centre in Belém, Brazil

Yvone B. Gabbay, Baoming Jiang, Consuelo S. Oliveira, Joana D.P. Mascarenhas, José Paulo G. Leite, Roger I. Glass and Alexandre C. Linhares
Journal of Diarrhoeal Diseases Research
Vol. 17, No. 2 (June 1999), pp. 69-74
Published by: icddr,b
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23498633
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
An Outbreak of Group C Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Among Children Attending a Day-care Centre in Belém, Brazil
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Abstract

In August 1993, an outbreak of group C rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis occurred among children attending a day-care centre in Belém, Brazil. Of the 64 children, 21 (33%) became ill. Group C rotavirus was identified in faecal specimens from 8 (38%) children with diarrhoea by electron microscopy (EM) and an enzyme immunoassay (EIA), using antibodies specific to the Cowden strain of porcine group C rotavirus. By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), a pattern similar to that of group C rotavirus was observed in 5 (62.5%) of the 8 EM- and EIA-positive samples. These 5 faecal samples were confirmed to be positive for group C rotavirus by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, using specific VP6 and VP7 primers. This is the first report of an outbreak of diarrhoea in North Brazil associated with group C rotavirus. These findings suggest that group C rotavirus may be an important aetiological agent of diarrhoea in this region, which requires further study.

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