Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Perceptions of Women about Menstrual Regulation Services: Qualitative Interviews from Selected Urban Areas of Dhaka

Tanzina Nashid and Pia Olsson
Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition
Vol. 25, No. 4 (DECEMBER 2007), pp. 392-398
Published by: icddr,b
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23499469
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Perceptions of Women about Menstrual Regulation Services: Qualitative Interviews from Selected Urban Areas of Dhaka
Preview not available

Abstract

Menstrual regulation (MR) programmes were introduced in Bangladesh in 1974 to reduce morbidity and mortality due to unsafe abortions. About 468,000 MR procedures are performed annually, and its potential is not fully used. To develop MR programmes, the voices of women could add important aspects to its acceptability. This qualitative interview study aimed to explore and describe the perceptions about MR in a sample of women from Dhaka, Bangladesh. The most prominent perception was that, despite the moral dilemma inherent in terminating pregnancies, MR was highly valued as a solution in problematic life situations. However, unprofessional attitudes and misconduct among MR providers were revealed, and there was also a lack of knowledge and openness in families. To improve the quality of MR services, professional ethics needs to be highlighted in training and supervision of providers. To improve the acceptability of MR, education on the benefits of MR has to be made available to the whole population.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[392]
    [392]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
393
    393
  • Thumbnail: Page 
394
    394
  • Thumbnail: Page 
395
    395
  • Thumbnail: Page 
396
    396
  • Thumbnail: Page 
397
    397
  • Thumbnail: Page 
398
    398