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The Struggle Between Adonijah and Solomon Over the Kingdom / המאבק על המלוכה בין אדוניהו לשלמה

שאול זלבסקי and S. Zalewski
Beit Mikra: Journal for the Study of the Bible and Its World / בית מקרא: כתב-עת לחקר המקרא ועולמו
כרך כ‎, חוברת ד (סג‎) (תמוז-אלול תשל"ה), pp. 490-510
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23503333
Page Count: 21
Topics: Bible, Old Testament
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The Struggle Between Adonijah and Solomon Over the Kingdom / המאבק על המלוכה בין אדוניהו לשלמה
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Abstract

The article contains three parts. The first deals with the question whether Nathan, the prophet, is guilty of intrigue. The argument that Nathan invented the story of the oath is refuted. David's oath to Bat Sheva that Solomon would rule after him was given privately. David never mentioned this oath to anyone, nor was he ever reminded of it by anyone, other than Bat Sheva who recalls his oath to her. This is why it was necessary for Nathan to send Bat Sheva to plead her case before the king. There is no need, however, to tie in the oath with the name of Yedidiah, added to the name Solomon in the presence of the prophet (II Sam. 12:25). With all the importance of the oath, there were additional considerations for the choice of Solomon over Adonijah which tipped the scale. The second part takes up the meaning of the festivity at En-rogel. It seems that the aim of the gathering there was to announce the coronation of Adonijah. This was a rebellious act against his father. Adonijah did not seek the permission of his father to hold the festivity, which was called without the latter's knowledge. The incentive for such an announcement was, as it were, a public manifestation of David's age and weakness. This kind of situation is known also from other ancient eastern literature. In the final section of the article, the three attempts of Adonijah to attain the kingdom are analyzed. His first try, described in I Kings 1 : 5—8, was when he took on the aura of a crown prince. The second is the one at En-rogel, related in I Kings 1 : 1—4, 9—10, 41—53, when he announced his kingship. The final attempt was his request to marry Abishag, the Shunammite, told in I Kings 2 : 13—25.

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