Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

THE "IMPERIAL AND ROYAL-COURT SCHUMANN ROBBER": THE UNPUBLISHED PIANO CYCLES OF ERNST VON DOHNÁNYI

Wendy H. W. Wong
Fontes Artis Musicae
Vol. 57, No. 1 (January-March 2010), pp. 86-114
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23512086
Page Count: 29
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
THE "IMPERIAL AND ROYAL-COURT SCHUMANN ROBBER": THE UNPUBLISHED PIANO CYCLES OF ERNST VON DOHNÁNYI
Preview not available

Abstract

Born and raised by a cultured and artistic family in Pozsony in 1877, Ernst von Dohnányi (1877—1960) steadfastly considered himself the legitimate heir to a romantic musical tradition practiced by Johannes Brahms. Although Brahms's musical influences are evident in many of Dohnányi's mature works, they do not emerge in any of his 29 unpublished piano works. Composed prior to his entry to the Budapest Academy in 1894 and currently housed at the British Library, these childhood compositions not only detail Dohnányi's development as a composer but also reveal Dohnányi's indebtedness to the music of Robert Schumann. Schumann's characteristic musical styles and language exerted considerable influence on Dohnányi's emerging musical sensibilities, as it had also informed the young Brahms. This suggests that both Dohnányi and Brahms found their musical individuality and originality through the character pieces of Schumann. Ernst von Dohnanyi (1877—1960) a grandi au sein d'une famille d'artistes à Pozsony. Il s'est rapidement considéré comme héritier légitime d'une tradition musicale romantique pratiquée par Johannes Brahms. Bien que l'influence de la musique de Brahms soit évidente dans de nombreuses oeuvres de maturité de Dohnanyi, celle-ci n'émerge dans aucune des 29 compositions inédites pour piano. Composées avant son entrée à l'Académie de Budapest en 1894, et actuellement conservées à la British Library, ces œuvres de jeunesse exposent non seulement le développement de Dohnanyi en tant que compositeur, mais révèlent également combien il doit à Robert Schumann. Les caractéristiques musicales de style et de langage de Schumann ont exercé une influence importante sur la sensibilité musicale de Dohnanyi, tout comme ce fut le cas avec le jeune Brahms. Ceci suggère que Dohnanyi et Brahms ont trouvé leur identité et leur originalité à travers les pièces de caractère de Schumann. Ernst von Dohnányi (1877—1960) wurde in Bratislava (Pressburg/Pozsony) geboren, wo er in einer kultivierten und künstlerisch interessierten Familie aufwuchs. Er betrachtete sich Zeit seines Lebens als den legitimen Erben einer romantischen Musiktradition in der Nachfolge von Johannes Brahms. Obwohl die musikalischen Einflüsse von Johannes Brahms in seinen reifen Werken deutlich zutage treten, spürt man davon in den 29 unveröffentlichten Klavierwerken nichts. Dohnányi komponierte diese Werke, die sich heute in der British Library befinden, vor seinem 1894 erfolgten Eintritt in die Budapester Musikhochschule. Diese Jugendwerke illustrieren nicht nur Dohnányis Entwicklung als Komponist, sondern spiegeln auch Dohnányis Nähe zur Musik Robert Schumanns wider. Schumanns Tonsprache und Stil übten einen immensen Einfluss auf Dohnányis aufkeimende musikalische Empfindung aus, ganz ähnlich wie beim jungen Brahms. Dies legt die Vermutung nahe, dass sowohl Dohnányi als auch Brahms ihre kompositorische Individualität und Originalität mithilfe der Charakterstücke Schumanns gefunden haben.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
86
    86
  • Thumbnail: Page 
87
    87
  • Thumbnail: Page 
88
    88
  • Thumbnail: Page 
89
    89
  • Thumbnail: Page 
90
    90
  • Thumbnail: Page 
91
    91
  • Thumbnail: Page 
92
    92
  • Thumbnail: Page 
93
    93
  • Thumbnail: Page 
94
    94
  • Thumbnail: Page 
95
    95
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114