Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Story of the Capture of Jerusalem in the Time of David and its Historical Significance / הסיפור על כיבושה של ירושלם בימי דוד ומשמעותו ההיסטורית

ב. דינבורג and B. Dinaburg
Zion / ציון
Vol. יא‎, חוברת ד‎ (תמוז תש"ו), pp. 153-167
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/23547063
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Story of the Capture of Jerusalem in the Time of David and its Historical Significance / הסיפור על כיבושה של ירושלם בימי דוד ומשמעותו ההיסטורית
Preview not available

Abstract

The author endeavours to explain the historical significance of the story relating to the capture of Jerusalem in the time of David, one of the obscurest episodes in the historical records of the Bible. On the basis of a minute collation of the two sources regarding the conquest that have come down to us (Samuel 11, 5, and Chronicles 1, 11) the author arrives at the conclusion that they constitute one source, the story in Chronicles being simply a continuation of the one in the Book of Samuel. The historical framework of the story is the conquest of Jerusalem as a first step in the rise and great military victories of David. From a literary point of view the story relates the heroic deeds of David and his followers which are connected with his accession to the throne. A close examination of the structure of the story reveals that the verses which speak of the "tunnel" (צינור) and of the "blind and the lame" relate to the manner in which the city of Jerusalem was captured. An analysis of the language and style of these verses and a comparison with the various translations (especially the Septuagint) shows that the version in our possession is correct and exact and that the various differences in the translations arise from the attempts made by the ancients to explain the words which were already then obscure. The key to the understanding of the story lies in a comprehension of the point of the story. The story simply conveys to us the fact that the city was captured by David through the spring and the tunnel which led from it to the castle or fortress. David discovered this route due to his understanding aright the veiled talk of the Jebusites who apparently declared that he would not be able to capture the city. The true significance of the declaration of the Jebusites is: Except thou take away the blind and the lame that are with thee, who do not see the way and cannot walk therein, thou shalt not come in hither. Through Davids having discovered the tunnel he removed the blind, and through Joab's going up first (as related in the continuation of the narrative in the Book of Chronicles) he removed the lame. For that reason Joab became "chief" of the valiant men and "captain" of the city. The author finds support for the contention in other places in the scriptures. Joab's name was purposely removed from the account in the Book of Samuel, in order to reduce his importance and share in the events leading to the accession of David, which had reached their climax with the capture of Jerusalem. The date of the capture of the city was after David's victories over the Philistines. In the scriptural story the capture of Jeruaslem is related after these victories with the intention of separating the narrative regarding the conquest of Jerusalem from the heroic deeds of David's followers who were headed by Joab.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[153]
    [153]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161
  • Thumbnail: Page 
162
    162
  • Thumbnail: Page 
163
    163
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167